Who is already gearing up for next year’s beach bod? Who is getting a head start on their New Year’s resolution? Anyone else have a wedding to go to this year? We all have our reasons to “get toned,” but what does being “toned” really take? Most people can point out a picture of what it looks like to be “toned,” yet have difficulty explaining the process or even understanding what it is.

Let’s clear up the confusion about toning and talk more about how you can reach your goals more efficiently this year (and next!).

What it means to be “toned”

“Toning.” I always use quotations or italics when writing about it because it is not a singular action, it is more of a slang term for a concept. The concept is this: decrease body fat, increase muscle mass. Some people shake their heads at this description, claiming that they want to be “slender, not bulky.” However, physiologically, both fat loss and muscle gain must occur to get the image of “toned” that these same people are after.

Looking at a “toned” person, one will notice subtle muscle definition. This definition is present because the subcutaneous fat layer (the layer of fat underneath the skin) is thin in that area, and the muscle is appropriately formed (size and shape).

Do you see why strengthening is an important part of this look? This concept is fortuitous because the more our muscles are used, the more calories we burn in general. Muscles are a high maintenance tissue: aside from the brain, they can require some of the highest numbers of calories to maintain, but only if they are being used. When our muscles are not used, our bodies break down the tissue to use as energy elsewhere or to be stored as fat.

Suffice to say, exercise is a key component of creating an individual’s optimally “toned” body. To address another common plight: do not be concerned about having to run all day and only eat salads.

Newer research has found that an appropriate training regimen including both aerobic and anaerobic exercise can produce body fat reduction. This is great news! Exercise that is aerobic and/or anaerobic in nature can be running, weightlifting, Zumba, or yoga. It’s more about the energy systems that your body is using rather than the actual activity.

Exact exercise variables and nutritional tips are subject for another article; the main point here is that multiple forms of exercise can create the “tone” you may be seeking.

Body Sculpting Through Electro Muscular Stimulation (EMS) Training

So, if you can do (almost) anything to “tone,” why consider Nuzuna? Let’s discuss how Nuzuna’s electro muscular stimulation (EMS) training program can make a difference for your workouts. These workouts involve the use of a bodysuit that provides electric stimulus to the body’s muscles during exercise sessions led by a trained professional.

woman with great muscle tone

By providing this stimulus, the muscles contract, thus creating a greater caloric expenditure during exercise. Remember how I said that muscles need to be used in order to utilize energy (i.e. burn calories) from the body? That usage takes the form of muscle contraction, and your muscles will experience an enhanced contraction with Nuzuna training.

There are a number of factors that play a role in getting results from your workouts, and two of them are efficiency and effectiveness. Working smart is integral to achieving success. Utilizing multiple muscle groups and working through an appropriately progressed workout program are excellent ways that using your brain (or someone else’s) can boost your results.

Nuzuna training provides both of these benefits, with research and professionals backing up their training programs. We all have goals; some seem insurmountable, others we struggle to make time for.

Charles Laverty
Charles Laverty

Charles Laverty is chief executive officer and founder of Nuzuna. Mr. Laverty has committed four decades to health and fitness starting with his studies in physical education at Parsons College in Fairfield Iowa. An advocate for wellness and physical education, Mr. Laverty is a well-regarded writer and speaker on issues affecting the US healthcare system including adult and childhood obesity, coronary disease and healthcare reform.